• Join HR Talk Show 2019 Live!

    Advance, upskill, and prepare your team for 4.0 Digital Economy with mastery.
  • ASEAN Gearing Up for a Digital Age

    Apply digital awareness, data analytics, computational thinking, agile project management methods, and human centered design!
  • The State of ASEAN HR Technology

    96% of ASEAN CEOs believe Industry 4.0 will transform business models.
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As we begin preparations, we are now discussing with speakers their big ideas that delegates will enjoy, find useful, and talk about long after the conference.
 
We had a quick chat with BAT Malaysia MD Erik Stoel and his realization while leading a 500-strong and USD 743 million business in the ‘Journey of Transformation’ initiated by British American Tobacco Malaysia (the Group) in 2016, necessitated by the challenging environment and impact caused by significant levels of illegal cigarettes in Malaysia. 
 
Successfully completed in 2017, the transformation aimed to strengthen their business model via reinforcing their commercial capabilities and optimising their supply chain and transactional activities. All done in order to maintain BAT Malaysia's leadership and to maximise shareholder returns given the challenging times for the legal tobacco industry.
 
New Ways of Working: Aurora
"In British American Tobacco Malaysia, we constantly believe and advocate the ethos of continuous improvement as a way of life. As we transition towards a much sharper, integrated and consumer-centric organisation in British American Tobacco Malaysia, we adopted Programme Aurora, the global British American Tobacco blueprint to evolve Human Resources into a leading, integrated, and agile function which is better able to work with the business as a true partner and drive change forward to deliver a world-class Human Resources function." says Erik.
 
"My job in 12 words is to 'coordinate, inspire and develop others to deliver a successful and rewarding business.'" A man of considered thought and thalassophile, Erik goes to the beach to think about "What's beyond?" and uses these insights to bring life to strategy.
 
Knowing your people, what they are about and being close to the ground make your strategy alive.  
 
"I don't feel I have to know it all. I really get excited and have a feel of accomplishment if I see my people/team breaking through their own barriers," Erik adds.
 
Erik, who uses the same philosophy during weekends as he tries to be a great father and husband, reveals "I haven't mastered this yet but will keep on going. I guess it's a rewarding life time project! It provides me the energy for everything else."
 
 
Talent-First CEO Playbook: Build a Culture that Drives Successful Business Outcomes
 
At the HR Talk Show 2018, Erik will show how he drives BAT Malaysia's successful business outcomes by building a winning culture of setting stretched goals, driving line managers to inspire team, and closing the 'thinking' culture loop with a 'thanking' element. 
 
Meet Erik at the HR Talk Show 2018. Email This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. to register.
 
 
 
Over 40 influential speakers and leaders in ASEAN MNCs will be sharing their stories at the HR Talk Show 2018. The HR Talk Show 2018 makes high-value business content easier to digest using a TV talk show format. 
 
This is Your Year
We have designed this year's program to be the “all-star” edition of the HR Talk Show, combining the best elements of the HR shows and congresses that we've organized in Kuala Lumpur, Singapore and Bali over the last 12 years.
  • 500 attendees
  • Highly interactive program in easy-to-digest TV talk show format
  • Side programs and activities to bring out the full humanity of the topics: mindfulness, social relevance, art, fitness, and more
  • Intense focus on hospitality for all participants: welcome drinks, entertainment, show and tell
Create higher level of consciousness and breathe life to HR strategy.

Visit HR Talk Show 2018

Over 40 CXOs and 500 top HR leaders in ASEAN distill insights into the power of mindfulness to achieve high dividend yields and employee well-being in today’s tumultuous age of speed. 

12 June 2018 (KUALA LUMPUR). ASEAN’s only Talk Show serving the Human Capital Management community welcomes over 40 change leaders at the HR Talk Show 2018 on September 5, 2018 in Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia—leading over 500 HR leaders to slow down, pay attention, and focus on meaningful leadership decisions to achieve resilience, agility and competitiveness in the context of ASEAN.

Based on how mindfully the region executes, ASEAN—a group of 10 economies in Southeast Asia and the most important trade bloc outside NATO—will either gain or lose up to $627 billion with the onset of the Fourth Industrial Revolution, a confluence of disruptive digital technologies and accelerated speed of change. The Chief Human Capital Officer of Malaysia’s most valuable bank, Maybank, Nora Manaf will deliver a keynote that examines the future of ASEAN corporations: ‘What is the new frontier for HR? How do we drive value for the organization in today’s competitive world?’ Use cases from other financial institutions will also be shared by speakers with experience from AIA, Standard Chartered and Manulife.

The International Labour Organization estimates that 56% of jobs in five ASEAN countries (Cambodia, Indonesia, Viet Nam, Thailand and the Philippines) are at high risk because of its lack in skills that can compete in today’s landscape, characterized by an astonishing rise in data volume, computing power, and connectivity; the emergence of advanced data analytics and business-intelligence capabilities; new forms of human-machine interaction; and improvements in how digital outcomes are transferred to the physical world, e.g., advanced robotics and 3-D printing. High-value chemicals company Venator Materials, fast-growth Indonesian start-up Go-Jek, and Malaysia’s largest pharmaceutical company, Pharmaniaga will expound how they have sustained attention on what matters and diminished distractibility from what doesn’t.

Infineon Technologies, a semiconductor company with a large presence in ASEAN countries, plans to invest more than $84 million in a smart factory in Singapore to test these technologies. The company expects to cut cycle times in half, increase productivity by 10 percent, and save $1 million a year in energy costs through the initiative. Infineon HR Director, Arulkumar Singaraveloo will lead a panel that brings awareness into existential factors like trust, accountability, social good, and collaboration in the age of robotics. 

Ironically, to win in the age of digital speed, leaders must first slow down. Leadership mindfulness is about ‘Paying attention in a particular way: on purpose, in the present moment, and non-judgmentally.’ Large companies, such as Google, Aetna and General Mills, have already been reaping rewards from implementing large-scale mindfulness programs, and ASEAN Inc’s most resilient companies have been making time to build higher level of consciousness for meaningful decision making.

Leadership is the heart of business. How can we ensure our workforces move up the value chain in unison? Technology is required, but it is not enough. Leadership is what it will take on our part as managers and business proprietors. ASEAN’s Fortune 200 powerhouse, Petronas has relied on higher level of consciousness to transform with agility in the new reality. Petronas Leadership Centre CEO, Nor Hazleen Madros and Group Head of Compensation and Benefits, Akmal Niza Ahmad will provide a mindful review of this year. Philippine’s largest distributor of electricity power, Meralco, Swizterland’s top 30 company, DKSH and pharmaceutical device company B Braun also share leadership perspectives for increasing productivity, reducing stress levels and raising quality in decision making.

On the right hand of strong leadership are dividend yields, on its left hand is employee well-being. Powerbrands Nestlé and Coca Cola will inspire delegates with on-the-ground perspectives on optimizing your sales teams, implementing L&D, and motivating the millennial workforce. Change leader and BAT Malaysia Managing Director Erik Stoel will deliver HR Talk Show 2018’s CEO keynote. Erik is one rare leader who possesses strong intentionality when it comes to taking care of human capital.

Excellent leadership creates both financial growth for the shareholders and resiliency through trying times for the engaged employees. Industry veteran, Wilson Fyffe will be chairing the HR Talk Show 2018. Wilson recommended strategy change in response to the 1997-98 Asian Financial Crisis, which resulted in a 40% improvement of actual results over plan for 1998. As CEO of KPMG Indonesia, he assisted at senior level with the reconstruction of the Indonesian banking industry. EY, PwC and 40 top organizations will also be sharing unique take on mindfulness.

“As we enter yet another cycle in the capitalist process of creative destruction, it is imperative to speak with the business leaders who have shown this leadership, and proven it both in their revenue performance and in their victories in the war for talent,” says Mr Rex Sayson, Program Curator, HR Talk Show 2018. 

“It is our hope that this top-notch practice leaders will bring our leaders authentic, practice-proven collective wisdom and wealth of courage to pave the way for ASEAN Inc’s future leap forward.”

The HR Talk Show 2018 (Conference: September 5, 2018 and Masterclass: September 6) is a high-impact interactive platform where CEOs and CHROs work with 500 participants in mindful leadership sessions to bring higher level of consciousness to ASEAN people leaders to lead in the age of digital speed. 

Join the conference and masterclass and be able to thrive in the Industrial 4.0 Economy, helping you in:

*Workplace Futurization: Pioneer a new era with mindfulness for your company’s subsequent leap forward 

*Fourth Industrial Revolution: Advance, upskill, and prepare teams to shape your organization’s future

*Value Transformation: Set systems of clarity and transform with purpose as a foundation of long-term value 

*Center of Excellence: Innovate, re-invent, and manage complexities with discipline 

 

Event Title: HR Talk Show 2018

Theme: Creating a Superior Talent Pipeline and Meeting Evolving Work Skills in the Digital 4.0 Era

Conference: September 5, 2018 | Masterclass: September 6, 2018

Venue: Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia

Website: www.amgfirst.com/hrtalkshow2018

To bring a team of 10, email info (at) amgfirst (dot) com and quote the group promo code 'HRTS18PR1' in the subject line. 

 

Over 40 use cases of transformative, mindful leadership and human capital strategies designed for ASEAN corporations and organizations:

This conference is designed for these job titles:

• CEOs

• CHROs, SVP-HR, HR Director

• HR Managers

• Head of Compensation and Benefits

• Head of Learning and Development

• Head, Workplace Futurization

 

This conference is designed for these industries:

• Automotive

• Oil & Energy 

• Electronics

• Life Sciences

• Financial

• High-Tech

• Skills Development

 

To sponsor or bring groups to the conference, contact:

Frank Mercado, Director Communications and Research

Arc Media Global LLC

11601 Wilshire Boulevard, 5th Floor, Los Angeles, CA 90025

 

Tel: 1-310-622-9159

Email: info (at) amgfirst (dot) com

Web: www.amgfirst.com/hrtalkshow2018

 

About Arc Media Global LLC 

AMG is an industry insights and learning company. We research, document, and impart bodies of industry theory and practice and systematize them for profitable instruction, improvement and innovation. Visit amgfirst.com for more info.

Our mission is that every professional will be complete and proficient, outfitted and thoroughly equipped for every good work through conferences, industry expos, industry consulting, and lifelong learning modules, apps and tools for the workforce.

 

Keywords:

ASEAN human capital management, HR Talk Show 2018, Arc Media Global, Center for Business Strategy and Tactics, Maybank, Petronas, British American Tobacco, mindful leadership, leadership mindfulness, Fourth Industrial Revolution

Dear Puan Aarifa,
It is unfortunate that we fired our top talent, Sonia. At least this is what I’d call her for the purpose of this letter. She dubbed herself as “Albert Einstein”—a nomenclature she derived from the last company she’d been in. 
She had been the lead developer and architect of our software projects, and had brought with her a culture of doing things that is isolated and siloed. She had not let anybody understand what she had built. 
However, she didn’t need anything anybody else built. She built everything she needed from scratch because she thought it was infinitely more superior than what the team had created. She stopped attending meetings and closed her door, because there was just too much to do, too much to code.
Of course, bugs were popping up in old tools she’d built. Too much bugs sapped her attention from meeting commitments on new product development. By the time we needed a team to help debug, no one could understand her system. At the end of a project cycle year, production-readiness was two years late!
We believe it’s the best decision. We may have lost hundreds of hours of Sonia’s contribution, but it also removed thousands of hours of technical debt.
Harry S, HR Director, ACME Software Pte Ltd

 

Have you had a similar experience as Harry S? In the new economy 4.0, a key solution is to find talent from outside the company, and this could disrupt your corporate culture and your core values that led you to success thus far. How does this story affect the way you hire, especially if the talent is high-potential and hard to find?

[above photo: McKinsey (2018) reports 7 disruptors that redefine how we work]

96% of ASEAN CEOs believe Industry 4.0 will transform business models

In a recent McKinsey survey (2018) of more than 200 business leaders throughout the 10 countries that make up the Association of Southeast Asian Nations (ASEAN), the transformative potential of Industry 4.0 was clearly confirmed. 

Almost all of the respondents, 96 percent, believed Industry 4.0 will bring new business models to their industries and, slightly less, 90 percent, said improved performance will be one of the main benefits from these new technologies. 

Additionally, in manufacturing-based economies such as Indonesia, Thailand, and Vietnam, respondents were generally optimistic about prospects of Industry 4.0. 

 

[above photos: From manual checking to predictive maintenance, McKinsey (2018) maps Future of Work]

How are the business models changing in the new economy?

Many global manufacturers are already capturing significant value from Industry 4.0 technologies.  

The venerable manufacturer Rolls-Royce, for instance, has overturned its model for jet-engine sales. The company today sells most of its airline engines at a loss, recouping the shortfall by selling real-time diagnostics and maintenance of the engine through its fee-based TotalCare program. It constantly collects data from thousands of in-service engines, helping it predict maintenance needs, improve performance, and amass an irreplicable knowledge base. TotalCare fees account for more than half the engine maker’s revenues. 

In another example, Statoil, the Norwegian oil and gas company, says it will invest $200 million by 2020 to introduce digital technologies broadly. Through the transformation, the company expects to boost its performance and improve its margins by offering solutions such as advanced analytics on geological models and predictive maintenance of offshore assets. 

 

[photo above: Industries attending HR Talk Show 2018 are adopters]

No industry is immune to the disruptions brought by digital technologies. Are you opening up to a value transformation and HR process to succeed in the new economy?

We all know about Eastman Kodak, once a giant in analog photography, failed to grasp the significance of digital technology and filed for bankruptcy in 2012.

Blockbuster, which built its rental business around the new technology of home videotape players, was crippled by Netflix and other streaming services, and in 2010 the master of video rentals declared bankruptcy.

Even the darling of Fourth Industrial Revolution in transportation, Uber, which reached a market value of more than $60 billion in just eight years, that also pushed aside the centuries-old cab business, isn’t immune to disruption. Uber has been pushed out of Southeast Asia by competitor, GrabTaxi. And Lyft is slowly winning in the US versus Uber.  

While media, telecommunications, and banking have been among the first to feel the full brunt of these new technologies, manufacturing is now coming into the crosshairs.

Globally, many manufacturers, especially those in advanced economies, have been looking for ways to exploit digital technologies. These efforts, generally dubbed “Industry 4.0,” are at a point where greater reliability and lower costs, largely attributable to improved storage and computing capacities, are fueling their rapid adoption over a variety of industry applications.

However, even as they acknowledged the potential, respondents showed slow adoption. Only 13 percent said their companies had begun an Industry 4.0 transformation. ASEAN manufacturers cannot risk failing to capture the large opportunities made possible by these new technologies. By embracing Industry 4.0, ASEAN manufacturers can become the next leaders in their fields. 

Mindfulness Checkup:

What if YOU are the reason your company’s growth is stunted? How would you execute mindfulness to transform?

 

How much ASEAN manufacturers will lose without transforming for Digital 4.0 Economy? Up to $627 billion.

In recent decades, ASEAN manufacturing, once seen as a global phenomenon, has been overshadowed by the meteoric rise of Chinese factories. The digital technologies associated with Industry 4.0 can help ASEAN manufacturers overcome relatively low productivity rates to regain their stature as factories to the world. 

Industry 4.0 is the confluence of disruptive digital technologies that together carry the potential to change the manufacturing sector beyond recognition. The movement has gained critical momentum as a number of factors have come together: an astonishing rise in data volume, computing power, and connectivity; the emergence of advanced data analytics and business-intelligence capabilities; new forms of human—machine interaction, such as touch interfaces and augmented-reality systems; and improvements in how digital outcomes are transferred to the physical world, for instance through advanced robotics and 3-D printing. 

Industry 4.0 is expected to drive productivity increases comparable to those generated by the introduction of the steam engine in the Industrial Revolution. Globally, it is expected to deliver between $1.2 trillion and $3.7 trillion in gains (Exhibit 2). Of this, ASEAN, whose member economies have significant manufacturing components, has the potential to capture productivity gains worth $216 billion to $627 billion.

Reflections:

Are you letting go of legacy processes to grow? Or are you getting in your own way? What are the critical success points that you may have overlooked?

 ]

[above photo: Percentage of ASEAN companies saying yes to upgrading to Industry 4.0]

How are ASEAN companies responding to meet the Industry 4.0 requirements?

ASEAN companies are exploring Industry 4.0 by introducing elements of these new technologies into their business models and are deriving value, such as:

Infineon Technologies, a semiconductor company with a large presence in ASEAN countries, plans to invest more than $84 million in a smart factory in Singapore to test these technologies. The company expects to cut cycle times in half, increase productivity by 10 percent, and save $1 million a year in energy costs through the initiative. 

Other ASEAN companies, such as Malaysian energy group Petronas and Indonesian mining- equipment maker PT Trakindo Utama, have launched efforts to digitize their operations and customer offerings. 

Similarly, OMRON, an automation-solution provider, has opened a $10 million Automation Center (ATC) in Singapore to help its local clients deploy their automation solutions. OMRON expects the large manufacturing base in ASEAN to migrate to more automated processes. 

Reflections:

What’s the most critical innovation that will affect your business? What are the data you can’t live without?

[above photo: ASEAN will lose up to $650 billion in revenues to disruption without upgrading to meet IR4.0] 

ASEAN Manufacturers, you are no stranger to technology-inspired disruptions. 

In the 18th century, manufacturing was upended by the machines and steam engines of the Industrial Revolution. 

In recent decades, robotics have eliminated human errors in many processes, triggering vast improvements in quality and efficiency. 

Now, digital technologies wrapped under the label “Industry 4.0” are sweeping through the manufacturing sector. 

Whether through advanced analytics or innovative interfaces, these technologies are boosting asset and labor productivity, accelerating time to market, and unleashing other efficiencies. 

Manufacturers in developed markets are eager to explore the potential of Industry 4.0, but ASEAN companies have been slower to climb aboard. 

You as a people leader of an ASEAN manufacturer cannot ignore the coming of age of these new technologies and must actively work to understand how they are altering business models and improving operations in ways that were hard to imagine just a few years back. 

Reflections:

Is your business model still relevant? Is your process to recruit and retain critical talent keeping with the new era? What use cases can you customize for success?

 

[above photo: Significant shortage in Talent 4.0 in ASEAN requires accelerated learning]

Finding that scarce talent you ever need 

As you adopt Industry 4.0 technologies, you will also have to adopt new processes and new roles will emerge. These changes will require capabilities that are likely alien to you right now as traditional manufacturers, such as data-mining and machine-intelligence expertise. 

Like Harry S story above, bringing in these skills from outside the company can be a quick way to acquire needed capabilities, but a large influx of new hires can disrupt the corporate culture and dampen employee motivation.  

Developing these capabilities internally may avoid morale or culture disturbances, but it prolongs the transformation, giving competitors a chance to jump ahead. 

The middle ground is a delicate balance between external hires and internal development. External hires can be role models for change, while existing staff energized by the potential improvements can form a strong support network for new hires. In our experience, companies typically fill 50 to 80 percent of the new roles required by Industry 4.0 through external hiring.

  • Wouldn’t it be great to build a fully balanced strategy of talent development as you shift to higher value products and services?
  • Wouldn’t it be great if you can overcome the barriers of implementation to higher value 4.0 services with higher level awareness?
  • Wouldn’t it be great if you can initiate internal collaborations, local alliances and global partnerships to leverage advanced capabilities?

Get linked by joining HR Talk Show 2018 live! 

It’s tough when almost every aspect of our lives will be touched: jobs, business models, industrial structures, social interactions, systems of governance. The Fourth Industrial Revolution will even challenge the very concept of what it means to be human. 

75% of 1600 CEOs in 19 countries surveyed convey that their organizations aren’t ready for the Fourth Industrial Revolution economy. (Deloitte, January 2018) 

2018 is the moment of great reset, threatening the incumbent market leaders, and rapidly advancing challengers. 

Attend the HR Talk Show 2018, on September 5, 2018, in Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia and gain higher level leadership consciousness, human capital tools and regional-global links to reimagine and boldly reinvent your future, as you embark in the Fourth Industrial Revolution. 

[above photo: BBC Anchor Veronica Pedrosa, hosting HR Talk Show 2011]

Established in 2007, the HR Talk Show series is a high-impact interactive platform bridging the gap between government and business initiatives to drive human capital best practices and actionable insights into talent, technology and strategic HR. In a unique talk show format, CEOs, HR Directors, CIOs/CTOs and their CFOs from ASEAN’s and the world’s most admired companies will be working with 400 participants to interactively walk through the most current human capital challenges in fast-growing economies to ensure that the most important leaders in businesses and public organizations can: 

• Stay superior and thrive in the Industry 4.0 economy

• Drive agility in learning, upskilling and leadership

• Cast off accident-prone legacy strategies for talent management

• Build digital awareness and evolve with fresh HR technology and services

• Leapfrog into disruptive roles with greater clarity of thought and vision

To sponsor or bring a group of 10, email the HR Talk Show 2018 Secretariat at This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it..

 

Sources:
Aiello, Chloe (2018). “Uber's loss jumped 61 percent to $4.5 billion in 2017.” CNBC, February 13, 2018. https://www.cnbc.com/2018/02/13/ubers-loss-jumped-61-percent-to-4-point-5-billion-in-2017.html
Arbulu, Imanol, et al (2018). “Industry 4.0: Reinvigorating ASEAN Manufacturing for the Future.” McKinsey and Company. White Paper for Digital Capability Center Singapore. February 2018.
Goldstein, Beth (2011). Lucky by Design: Navigating Your Path to Success. Marketing Edge Consulting Group, LLC. Dog Ear Publishing. 
Robinson, Tony (2017). “You fired your top talent. I hope you’re happy.” Redwhale. Blog Article, October 16, 2017. https://startupsventurecapital.com/you-fired-your-top-talent-i-hope-youre-happy-cf57c41183dd
San Juan, Alexandria and AFP. “Uber sells SE Asia business to rival Grab.” Manila Bulletin, March 27, 2018. https://business.mb.com.ph/2018/03/26/uber-sells-se-asia-business-to-rival-grab/
Solórzano-Hamilton, Jonathan (2017). “We fired our top talent. Best decision we ever made.” freeCodeCamp. Blog Article, October 12, 2017. https://medium.freecodecamp.org/we-fired-our-top-talent-best-decision-we-ever-made-4c0a99728fde

Click to Join

Vince Molinaro, managing director of the leadership practice at Knightsbridge Human Capital Solutions, Canada’s biggest HR advisory, tells clients he knows exactly when his career direction snapped into focus. It was at his first job out of college, with an organization that helped needy individuals get back on their feet. Vince loved the mission but found the atmosphere uninspiring. “Everyone just went through the motions,” he says. “I remember thinking, ‘Is this it? Is this what working in the real world is like?’”
A senior manager named Zinta sensed that Vince wanted to have a bigger impact, and asked him to join several likeminded colleagues on a committee to make their workplace a more positive environment. They began to make subtle changes, and coworkers’ attitudes started to improve. “I saw firsthand how a single manager can change the culture of a place,” he says.
Then Zinta was diagnosed with aggressive lung cancer. In her absence, the office culture began to revert back. On a visit to see Zinta in the hospital, Vince told her about the disappointing turn of events. She surprised him with a confession: Since she had never smoked and had no history of cancer in her family, she was convinced that her disease was a direct function of putting up with a toxic work environment for so long.
Shortly after, Zinta sent Vince a letter telling him he would be faced with an important choice throughout his life. He could allow the negative attitudes of others to influence his behavior, or pursue professional goals because of the sense of personal accomplishment they offered. “In her time of need she reached out to me,” he says. “She was a mentor to me even though she didn’t need to be.”
Two weeks later, Zinta passed away. But the letter changed Vince’s life, inspiring him to leave his job and start his own consulting business devoted to helping people be better leaders. “I’ve seen the kind of climate and culture that a great leader can create,” he says. “For the last 25 years, I’ve tried to emulate that.” He still has Zinta’s letter.
When Vince first began sharing this story with his leadership clients, he was taken aback by their reaction. “There was a connection they had to me that was really surprising, he says. “It’s like they got me in ways that I wasn’t able to directly communicate.”
“It also gets them thinking about their own story and the leaders that have influenced them. In my case, it was a great leader. Sometimes it’s the really bad ones you learn a lot from.” Whatever the case, he says, the power comes from sharing your story with the people you lead so they better understand what motivates you.

This is a great story shared by O'Hara (2014), and with mindfulness, we can glean leadership nuggets and practical wisdom for leaving a positive, measurable impact that lasts for more than a moment in our organizations and beyond.  

But first, what is an impact?

Oxford Dictionary defines impact with two fundamentally varying views of causality: (1) originating the action, ie, ‘the action of one object coming forcibly into contact with another’ and (2) receiving the action, ie, ‘a marked effect or influence’.

Statistics and econometrics define impact by the measured difference of a predefined indicator (e.g. school test score) with the intervention and without the intervention. OECD-DAC defines impact broadly in terms of any long-term effect, whether intended, unintended, positive, negative, direct or indirect.

Researchers understand the impact and meaningfulness of their journal contributions with the impact factor (IF), a measure of the frequency with which the average article in a journal has been cited in a particular year. It is used to measure the importance or rank of a journal by calculating the times articles are cited, so that an Impact Factor of 1.0 means that, on average, the articles published one or two year ago have been cited one time. 

For technical analysts, a factor's impact on securities is filtered or purified through moving averages. The 200-day moving average, for instance, smooths out the noise from daily cracks and anything breaking a 200-day moving average can reveal trend strength for determining profitable entry and exit points into specific securities. 

So for the purpose of this post, an impact will be defined as a filtered, measured and understood effect or influence both initiated and received, meaningful and profitable for longer-term use.

 

So how was impact achieved in this story? 

(1) Intentional Fellowship

In this story, senior manager, Zinta took a deliberate action to lead and connect with her team. Zinta had an observable conscious connection to what was happening in the present workplace. She understood the need for a culture change, got a sense of who the committee members would be, and realized results to make their workplace a more positive environment.

Because she was present in the here and now, she sensed the people's desire and objectives. Because she wasn't confused by past baggage and future fears, she understood exactly what subtle changes needed to be made to improve coworkers' attitudes. Because she led with intention, her presence singlehandedly changed the culture of the workplace. 

McKinsey senior partner, Claudio Feser's study (2016) revealed that the ability to inspire can be grounded in a set of conscious, intentional, and learnable behaviors. Inspirational leadership can be built with deliberate practice.

Mindfulness check up: How deliberately are you connecting with your team? How are connectedness and its business impact being measured? How has intentional fellowship translated to personalized training programs for your organization? 

 

(2) Increased Fervency 

I could only imagine that the team felt Zinta's intensity, ardor and zeal for leading because Zinta was leading in her death bed!

When Zinta was diagnosed with lung cancer and had to work off site, she wrote her team members 'coaching letters' discussing life and impact. She wrote that they would be faced with important choices throughout life, about the battle against negative attitudes of others to destroy good behavior, and about the pursuit of professional goals with a sense of personal purpose.

Rogers (1993) study revealed that it's a natural phenomenon for individuals to resist change. He observed that the person-centered approach, with emphasis on individual self-direction in a facilitative climate, decreases alienation and resistance. He saw that individuals who are resisting change require that they be taken seriously, listened to and understood.

Mindfulness check up: Can you measure your fervency in leadership? What will you give up for leadership? How has increased fervency enabled you to drive better staff retention, sales numbers and customer satisfaction? 

 

(3) Incessantly Fruitful

Sadly, Zinta passed away. But the letter she wrote changed one member's life, Vince’s, inspiring him to leave his job and start his own consulting business devoted to helping people be better leaders. “I’ve seen the kind of climate and culture that a great leader can create,” he says. “For the last 25 years, I’ve tried to emulate that.”

Today, he still has Zinta’s letter.

Vince's now uses this impact story to inspire his clients who are also leaders in their organizations, and Zinta's legacy lives on.

The impact happened because an authentic and direct kind of leadership has been exercised that did away with what De Smet, Aaron and Chris Gagnon (2018) warns us as "clay layers" where middle management "add value" by refining, augmenting, synthesizing, piling on, micromanaging, and adjusting information that passes their way--slowing the fruition of impact because personal incentives and cognitive biases inadvertently give rise to hockey-stick forecasts, sandbagging, and poor decision making.

Mindfulness check up: How are your heroes in your organization? How are you instituting their legacy to sustain a life-giving organization? How has your impact story turned your company from lagging to leading?

The truth is this: Impact is a function of teachability.

It only takes one life influencing another life to make a lasting impact. We are competing at the speed of digital, mindfulness enables us to organize for the age of urgency. Join us for a purposeful mindfulness practice at HR Talk Show 2018, September 5, 2018, Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia. 

Over 40 top ASEAN and global leaders and 500 people leaders converge at the HR Talk Show 2018 to discuss ASEAN's human capital, including:

  • Wilson Fyffe, President, Amplios Consultants, Singapore and former CEO, KPMG Indonesia - Session 1 Chairperson, Session 3 Chairperson, and Post-Conference Masterclass Leader
  • Sunder Rajan, Principal Consultant, HRM Mentor and former HR Director, Mahindra Group - Welcome Keynote Speaker and Session 2 Chairperson
  • Nora Abd Manaf, Senior Executive Vice President and Group Chief Human Capital Officer, Maybank - CHRO Keynote Speaker
  • Claudia Cadena, Founder and Principal Consultant, Thread Advisory and former Chief Human Resources Officer, Malaysia Airlines - Women in the Workforce Panel Moderator
  • Fong Tuan Chen, Chief People Officer, Mah Sing Group Berhad - Sourcing, Recruitment and Retention Panel Moderator
  • Sureash Kumar, General Manager - Human Resources, B. Braun Medical - Compensation and Benefits Panel Moderator
  • Karen Yap, Consultant, and former Chief Human Resources Officer, Manulife Holdings Berhad - HR Technology Panel Moderator
  • Jason Wong Khai Fong, Org. Development & Learning for Singapore, Malaysia and Brunei, Coca-Cola Bottlers Malaysia Sdn. Bhd. - Learning and Development Panel Moderator
  • Dr. Susan P. Chen, Senior Vice President & Head of OD & Transformation, GO-JEK Group - Agility Panel Moderator
  • Dr. Mohammad Shahir, Director, Advisory, EY - Digital HR Panel Co-Moderator
  • Dr. Lye Kim Soon, Group Strategy Director - Global Strategy Director, DKSH - Digital HR Panel Co-Moderator
  • Arulkumar Singaraveloo, HR Director, Business Consulting & Services, Infineon Technologies - Millennials Panel Moderator
  • Dato’ Farshila Emran, Managing Director, Pharmaniaga Berhad - Panelist, Women in the Workforce
  • Nadiah Tan Abdullah, Chief Human Resources Officer, S P Setia Berhad - Panelist, Women in the Workforce
  • Florence Tan, Corporate Responsibility (CR) Manager, PwC - Panelist, Women in the Workforce
  • Akmal Niza Ahmad, Head Compensation and Benefits of Group HRM, PETRONAS - Panelist, Compensation and Benefits
  • Masliza Mansor, Human Resources Director, First Solar Malaysia - Panelist, HR Technology
  • Azrul Fazly Mohammadiah, Regional HR Lead - Asia Pacific, Venator Asia Sdn Bhd - Panelist, Learning and Development
  • Nor Hazleen Madros, CEO, PETRONAS Leadership Centre - Panelist, Learning and Development
  • Carol Murugiah, Sales Training and Development Manager, Nestlé Products Sdn Bhd - Panelist, Learning and Development
  • Shu-Tze Tan, Founder, Talent Management and Organizational Effectiveness and Strategist, and Business Coach, Alignz Associates, former Director of Talent & Organisational Development, AIA, and former Group Head of Talent Management, Sime Darby Berhad - Panelist, Agility
  • Rosfariza Mohd Amin, Head of Human Resources, Muhibbah Engineering (M) Bhd. - Panelist, Millennials
Sources:
Coghlan, David (1993). "A Person‐centred Approach to Dealing with Resistance to Change", Leadership & Organization Development Journal, Vol. 14 Issue: 4, pp.10-14, 
De Smet, Aaron and Chris Gagnon (2018). “Organizing for the age of urgency.” McKinsey Quarterly, January 2018. https://www.mckinsey.com/featured-insights/leadership/when-execution-isnt-enough 
Feser, Claudio (2016). When Execution Isn’t Enough: Decoding Inspirational Leadership. John and Wiley, 2016. https://www.mckinsey.com/featured-insights/leadership/when-execution-isnt-enough
Hearn, Simon (2016). “What do we mean by ‘impact’?” Blog Post, February 18, 2016. Research to Action. http://www.researchtoaction.org/2016/02/what-do-we-mean-by-impact/ 
O’Hara, Carolyn (2014). “How to Tell a Great Story.” Harvard Business Review. July 30, 2014. https://hbr.org/2014/07/how-to-tell-a-great-story
Oustry, Francois (2017). “The Impact of Leadership on Individual Creativity and Organisational Innovation.” September 24, 2017. Excerpts from the Indian Journal of Science and Technology. https://medium.com/@foustry/the-impact-of-leadership-on-individual-creativity-and-organisational-innovation-6519d351127d
“Technical Analysis: Moving Averages." https://www.investopedia.com/university/technical/techanalysis9.asp#ixzz5H3b9XgPT 
Dear Puan Aarifa,
I’d like to share my experience with the hope of encouraging other leaders who are leading their organizations in the cusp of change. 
In the span of 60 years, our business has undergone several transformations—from selling charcoal then hardware through to becoming the largest DIY retail chain in Singapore and Malaysia. All these only to find ourselves reinventing our business model again to compete with online platforms like Amazon and Taobao.
We had been mindful of how our customers’ interaction with us have changed, and in the process we had found our physical stores turning into “showrooms." Young customers no longer see the mall as a place to buy things... This has been an ongoing change, and as a key step, we had used training as a way to go around it.
This higher-level awareness led us to shift our “brick-and-mortar” model to “experience” model—reinventing and right-sizing our physical stores into value-added service stores. Our core mission had to be adapted too - now focused on ‘service-centeredness’ where various courses are held – from teaching patrons to use specific power tools, to building their own wardrobe, to coding.
My team had to be transformed into coaches and trainers so they can teach patrons how to build their own furniture and fix up their homes and patrons can ask our handymen to do home repairs. 
We’ve seen our competitive advantage transform, building new relationships with our customers, doing things which online stores will find hard to replicate.
Sincerely, 
CK Lee, Home Supplies Sdn Bhd

Congratulations! You’ve changed your business model to thrive in the new landscape; here’s why you’ll still have 3 years to survive… 

The speed of change is just too much for your current team to handle.

The speed of change under the revolution is accelerating, and the old ways of creating new value through learning are too slow, too backward-looking and too rigid. 

ADB (2017) reports that the processing power of computer chips (from the Third Industrial Revolution) has increased by 1 trillion times over the past 50 years, and quantum computing has the potential to perform tasks that are barely conceivable today, eradicating the need for human agency. Nonetheless, education systems to support this speed in most ASEAN member states continue to rely on traditional curriculums, and many schools lack proper equipment (Tey, 2017, ADB). Only Singapore has been progressively adapting its education system and promoting 4IR re-skilling with its SkillsFuture program.

Additionally, Bersin (2017) reports that the average learner is overwhelmed to catch up, with only 1% of a typical work week allotted to focus on training and development (Bersin, 2017). Diagram below: 

Reflections:

  1. Are you aware of your team’s learning speed quotient—their ability to unlearn, relearn, and create new value?
  2. Is speed in learning a key metric in your recruitment, retention, and development plan?
  3. With this insight, what are your next steps for your learning and development programs?

 

Your competitors are too big that they are even getting cities to change for them. 

In May 2, 2018 Wall Street Journal report, Amazon has selected 20 finalists from 238 applicants from metro areas and regions like Detroit and Baltimore to small towns in Texas for its $5 billion second corporate headquarters, which it has said could create up to 50,000 high paying jobs.

Demand in its request for proposals included a metro area with a population of more than one million, public transportation, a big airport with plenty of connections to Seattle and a large pool of tech talent.

When Amazon made about 200 phone calls to cities the retail giant rejected for its second headquarters, some of the cities expressed disappointment to a point of making changes.

Cincinnati and Sacramento, California are restructuring workforce developments to focus on tech talent. Orlando, Florida, is considering starting a community fund to invest in local tech companies and draw more entrepreneurs. In Detroit, elected officials and business leaders are pushing a ballot initiative for a new regional transportation network that would connect outer counties to the city.  

Reflections:

  1. Which playing field are you most vulnerable to gargantuan disruptors?
  2. What talent strategy will increase your likelihood of success despite unforeseen disruption?
  3. How can you leverage on the major shifts being forced into the field you play?

 

Your data points can’t really help you become surely predictive. 

Does your data lead you to emerging customer behavior patterns and help you tailor your interactions with them? Are you empowered to process and make sense of massive data points?

Like CK Lee in the above letter, you may have already donned the thinking cap on how to effectively transform and have successfully executed the level of value for your company. 

In ASEAN specifically, Industry 4.0 changes the global landscape of manufacturing competition, reducing the relative competitive advantage of low-cost regions that rely on cheap labour. 

So three (3) skillful questions to ask are: 

  1. How long will this newly ‘transformed’ form last? 
  2. How fast can you transform to the next level?
  3. How can the ‘next level’ be ascertained?

In the context of Malaysia, the Ministry of International Trade and Industry released a Draft National Industry 4.0 Policy Framework and highlighted Industry 4.0 Transformation Drivers below:

Industry 4.0 is fundamentally reshaping the jobs landscape and will foster significant changes in how industrial worker perform their jobs. Entirely new jobs with very different skill requirements will be created, while others, especially manual tasks, will become obsolete. The shifting employment landscape has significant implications for industry, education systems, and the Malaysian government.

A qualified and skilled workforce is indispensable for the introduction and adoption of Industry 4.0. The technical knowledge required is high, and will be primarily recruited from the STEM (science, technology, engineering, mathematics) subjects. However, for some years the number of STEM graduates has fallen below expectations. 

There is an urgent need to create a skilled and diverse workforce, with high salary, both by up-skilling the existing labour pool and by attracting and developing future talent in the manufacturing sector. Particular attention also needs to be given to re-skilling and re-deploying lesser skilled workers to other sectors and activities.

IR 4.0 is a buzzword in ASEAN, but according the Malaysian Ministry of International Trade and Industry, challenges are very clear for the Malaysian Industry to catch up because there are:

  1. Lack of awareness on the impact of and need for Industry 4.0 technologies, both in terms of opportunities and business model disruption, especially among SMEs. 
  2. Lack of a centralized and easily accessible information platform to understand best practices and relevant use cases
  3. Significant shortage of required talents, skills & knowledge for Industry 4.0, particularly in the areas of IoT, robotics and AI

Wouldn’t it be great to have a fully prepared up-skilling and learning strategy? Get your solutions by joining HR Talk Show 2018 live! 

 

It’s tough when almost every aspect of our lives will be touched: jobs, business models, industrial structures, social interactions, systems of governance. The Fourth Industrial Revolution will even challenge the very concept of what it means to be human. 

75% of 1600 CEOs in 19 countries surveyed convey that their organizations aren’t ready for the Fourth Industrial Revolution economy. (Deloitte, January 2018)

2018 is the moment of great reset, threatening the incumbent market leaders, and rapidly advancing challengers. 

Attend the HR Talk Show 2018, on September 5, 2018, in Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia and gain the wisdom to know what must be preserved and honored from the past and muster the courage to reimagine and boldly reinvent your future, as you embark in the Fourth Industrial Revolution. 

[above photo: HR Talk Show Sponsors, Delegates, Banquet, Awards, TV Interviews and Red Carpet]

Established in 2007, the HR Talk Show series is a high-impact interactive platform bridging the gap between government and business initiatives to drive human capital best practices and actionable insights into talent, technology and strategic HR. In a unique talk show format, CEOs, HR Directors, CIOs/CTOs and their CFOs from ASEAN’s and the world’s most admired companies will be working with 400 participants to interactively walk through the most current human capital challenges in fast-growing economies to ensure that the most important leaders in businesses and public organizations can:

• Stay superior and thrive in the Industry 4.0 economy

• Drive agility in learning, upskilling and leadership

• Cast off accident-prone legacy strategies for talent management

• Build digital awareness and evolve with fresh HR technology and services

• Leapfrog into disruptive roles with greater clarity of thought and vision

To sponsor or bring a group of 10, email the HR Talk Show 2018 Secretariat at This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it..

 

Sources:
Draft National Industry 4.0 (2017). Malaysian Ministry of International Trade and Industry. February 9, 2018. 
Ng, Kelly (2018). “Boss of DIY chain Home-Fix reinvents to prevent stores from turning into showrooms.” Today, May 1, 2018. https://www.todayonline.com/singapore/boss-diy-chain-home-fix-reinvents-prevent-stores-turning-showrooms
Ole, Adrian and Cheryl Chow (2017). “The Future of Work.” Presentation Slide Deck. Deloitte Consulting Southeast Asia.
Rice, Shayndi and Laura Stevens (2018). “‘Hi, It’s Amazon Calling. Here’s What We Don’t Like in Your City.’” Wall Street Journal, May 2, 2018.
Tey, Sovannaroth (2017). “Is ASEAN ready for the fourth industrial revolution?” ADB Blog, July 6, 2017. https://blogs.adb.org/blog/asean-ready-fourth-industrial-revolution

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